Fruit juice in your diet

Wondering how 100% fruit juice could have a place in your diet? There’s so much confusion about this, so you’re not alone.

Check out our information to sort fact from fiction:

Why drink 100% fruit juice?
Eat more fruit and veg
Juice in a balanced diet

100% fruit juice or whole fruit?

It’s not a case of choosing one or the other: fruit juice is best consumed as part of a diet rich in fruits and vegetables

 

There is no direct evidence to show that drinking fruit juice is less beneficial to eating whole fruits or vegetables, however consuming one small glass of 100% fruit juice should complement rather than replace whole fruits and vegetables.1,2 Fruit juice offers a convenient, delicious way to fit a serving of fruit into your diet The vitamins and minerals in 100% juice, squeezed from the juice in whole fruit, can support good health. In addition:

  • People who drink 100% fruit juice eat more whole fruit and vegetables1
  • 100% fruit juice complements rather than replaces whole fruit and vegetable intake1,2
  • 100% fruit juice can help children become used to the taste of fruit and vegetables which may lead to long-term positive health choices2
  • One small glass of 100% fruit juice a day contributes to total fruit & vegetable consumption1

 

As you can see from these facts, drinking fruit juice daily helps increase your fruit and vegetable intake and can even help establish healthy eating habits, especially in children. See ‘Why drink 100% fruit juice?’ and Eat more fruit and veg for more information.

 

References:

  1. Gibson, S. Fruit juice consumption in the National Diet and Nutrition Survey (NDNS 2008-2010): associations with diet quality and indices of obesity and health. Proceedings of the Nutrition Society 2012, 71, pp. E23.
  2. CREDOC. Comportements et consommation alimentaire en France 2010. Enquête CCAF 2010. 2010.
Read more
whole_fuit_vs_juice.jpg

Why drink 100% fruit juice?

While official guidelines differ from country to country, in general, national guidelines follow WHO advice to eat at least 400g of fruit and vegetables per day; in countries such as Germany and the UK, this has been translated to eat at least 5 portions (‘5 a Day’).1,2

 

100% fruit juice counts towards these five portions in many European countries and a glass a day can count as a portion of fruit intake. There is yet no scientific consensus on the perfect portion size of 100% fruit juice, but in countries where juice is part of dietary guidelines  One glass (one portion) can count towards your 5 a Day. Your other portions of fruit and vegetables should come from whole fruits.

 

Unfortunately, at this time, most people in Europe do not eat anywhere near the recommended minimum 400g/5AD, and removing fruit juice from the equation only results in far fewer people reaching this healthy goal. In fact, drinking fruit juice daily helps increase your fruit and vegetable intake.3 100% fruit juice is a convenient, delicious way to get a serving of fruit into your diet, complementing whole fruit and vegetable consumption as research shows:

  • People who drink 100% fruit juice eat more whole fruit and vegetables.4
  • 100% fruit juice complements rather than replaces whole fruit and vegetable intake.3
  • 100% fruit juice can help children become used to the taste of fruit and vegetables which may lead to long-term positive health choices.4
  • According to a US study, 100% fruit juice is “an important source of potassium and magnesium and has been positively linked to achieving recommended intakes of vitamin C and folate”5 amongst 2-5 year old children

 

References

  1. World Health Organization. Fact sheet N°394. Available at: http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs394/en/ [Last accessed 8 February 2017]
  2. NHS UK. 5 A DAY: what counts? Available at: http://www.nhs.uk/livewell/5aday/pages/whatcounts.aspx [Last accessed 8 February 2017]
  3. Gibson, S. Fruit juice consumption in the National Diet and Nutrition Survey (NDNS 2008-2010): associations with diet quality and indices of obesity and health. Proceedings of the Nutrition Society 2012, 71, pp. E23.
  4. CREDOC. Comportements et consommation alimentaire en France 2010. Enquête CCAF 2010. 2010.
  5. Fulgoni V and Quann E. National trends in beverage consumption in children from birth to 5 years: analysis of NHANES across three decades. Nutrition Journal 2012, 11:92. Available at: http://www.nutritionj.com/content/11/1/92.

 

More info
Balanced_diet.jpg

Juice in a balanced diet

This page is currently being updated to bring you the best information possible. Come back soon!

Read more
nutritional_benefits.jpg

Eat more fruit and veg

Healthy eating behaviours

In Europe, most people don’t eat anywhere near enough fruit and vegetables.1,2 Drinking a glass of fruit juice every day can help people increase their daily fruit and vegetable intake. A small glass of 100% fruit juice is a convenient way to get a portion of fruit and contribute to the minimum of 400g of fruit & veg’ we should eat each day. 100% fruit juice supports a healthy diet as it contains vitamins and minerals that are essential to good health. 

For example: Orange juice is a rich source of vitamin C and contains other nutrients including folate, potassium and phytonutrients.3.4 

An analysis of NHANES (US government data) published in the Nutrition Journal 2012 shows that amongst 2-5 year-old children, 100% fruit juice is “an important source of potassium and magnesium in the diets of these children and has been positively linked to achieving recommended intakes of vitamin C and folate.”5 Other research also shows that drinking fruit juice helps children become used to the taste – and acceptance – of whole fruit and vegetables.6

 

Vitamins and minerals

The vitamins and minerals in 100% fruit juice come from the fruit from which it is squeezed, which makes it similarly nutrient rich; for example, 100ml of 100% orange juice contains around 220mg of micronutrients.  

Different 100% fruit juices contain a variety of vitamins and minerals that are essential to the diet. For more information, see our page on vitamins and minerals.

 

References:

  1. Gibson, S. Fruit juice consumption in the National Diet and Nutrition Survey (NDNS 2008-2010): associations with diet quality and indices of obesity and health. Proceedings of the Nutrition Society 2012, 71, pp. E23.
  2. European Fresh Produce Association (Freshfel Europe) Consumption Monitor 2014
  3. UK Department of health. Nutrient analysis of fruit and vegetables. Available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/167942/Nutrient_analysis_of_fruit_and_vegetables_-_Summary_Report.pdf
  4. EU Commission Regulation 432/2012 of 16/05/2012
  5. Fulgoni V and Quann E. National trends in beverage consumption in children from birth to 5 years: analysis of NHANES across three decades. Nutrition Journal 2012, 11:92. Available at: http://www.nutritionj.com/content/11/1/92.
  6. CREDOC. Comportements et consommation alimentaire en France 2010. Enquête CCAF 2010. 2010.
Read more
icon_busy.png

Tip for busy people

This page is currently being updated to bring you the best information possible. Come back soon!

View tips
icon_parents.png

Tips for parents

This page is currently being updated to bring you the best information possible. Come back soon!

View tips
icon_sports.png

Tips for sportspeople

This page is currently being updated to bring you the best information possible. Come back soon!

View tips

Juice and kids

This page is currently being updated to bring you the best information possible. Come back soon!

Read more

Juice for all ages and stages

This page is currently being updated to bring you the best information possible. Come back soon!

Read more

Need more information?

Head to our contact page to get in touch with the team at Fruit Juice Matters.

Contact us